Nothing will motivate a man to move forward faster than knowing what's behind Him.


1. Frank Lucas, is a former U.S. heroin dealer and organized crime boss who operated in Harlem during the late 1960s and early 1970s. He was particularly known for cutting out middlemen in the drug trade and buying heroin directly from his source in the Golden Triangle. Lucas boasted that he smuggled heroin using the coffins of dead American servicemen,  but this claim is denied by his South East Asian associate, Leslie “Ike” Atkinson.  His career was dramatized in the 2007 feature film American Gangster in which Lucas is played by Denzel Washington.

Otis Ray Redding, Jr. , Soul singer. Often called the “King of Soul”, he is renowned for an ability to convey strong emotion through his voice.  According to the website of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (where he was inducted in 1989), Redding’s name is “synonymous with the term soul, music that arose out of the black experience in America through the transmutation of gospel and rhythm and blues into a form of funky, secular testifying.”   In addition, rock critic Jon Landau said in 1967, “Otis Redding is rock & roll”.  Redding died in a plane crash at the age of 26, one month before his biggest hit, “(Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay”, was released.

 Inez Foxx, along with her brother Charlie were a rhythm and blues and soul duo from Greensboro, North Carolina. Inez sang lead vocal, while Charlie sang back-up and played guitar.

Their most successful record was with their novelty composition, “Mockingbird”. Released in 1963, it made the Top 10 on both the rhythm and blues and pop charts; the song was later covered by James Taylor and Carly Simon, as well as Dusty Springfield and more recently by country music artist Toby Keith (featuring his daughter, Krystal). Other notable recordings were “Hurt by Love,” “Ask Me,” and “(1-2-3-4-5-6-7) Count the Days.”

They were known for their exciting live performances, of which a highlight was Inez’s rendition of “I Stand Accused”, which finished with a supposedly distraught Inez singing the last verse, while being carried offstage by Charlie. They toured extensively in Europe and their music played a key role in the development of the Northern Soul movement.

Inez also had some success recording on her own, beginning in 1969, but her popularity faded in the 1970s. Charlie was already working as a record producer when they finally disbanded their act.

Inez Foxx was married to the American songwriter and producer Luther Dixon. Together they wrote, and he produced, The Platters’ mid-1960s return to hit-making with the single “I Love You 1000 Times”.   Luther Dixon produced Inez and Charlie’s 1967 album Come By Here, but the couple later divorced.

Dee Dee Sharp (born Dione LaRue), is an R&B singer, who began her career recording as a backing vocalist in 1961.

In 1962 she began a string of successful Billboard Hot 100 Top 10 hits: “Slow Twistin'” (with Chubby Checker) (#3), “Mashed Potato Time” (#2), “Gravy (For My Mashed Potatoes)” (#9), “Ride” (#5) and “Do the Bird” (#10). Both “Mashed Potato Time” and “Ride” each sold over one million copies, and were awarded gold discs.  “Do the Bird” provided her only entry in the UK Singles Chart, where it peaked at #46 in April 1963.  In 1967, she married record producer Kenny Gamble and has since recorded under the name Dee Dee Sharp-Gamble.

She had a brief career resurgence during the disco era: as a member of the Philadelphia International All Stars (which also included Lou Rawls, Billy Paul, Teddy Pendergrass, The O’Jays and Archie Bell) she had a minor hit with “Let’s Clean Up the Ghetto.”

In 1980 she spent four weeks at number one on the Hot Dance Club Play chart with “Breaking and Entering” / “Easy Money,” from her album Dee Dee.

More recent appearances included a performance at Pontins in the UK for the Northern Soul Show, and at the 2008 Detroit Jazz Festival. In May 2009, she appeared in Belgium at the Salle De L’Hotel de Ville.

 

Benjamin Roy “B. J.” Armstrong, Jr., is a retired American professional basketball player. As a starting point guard, he was an integral part of the NBA’s Chicago Bulls dynasty of the 1990s.

His playing career left him with several distinctions, including being the last Chicago Bull to wear the number 10 jersey. The jersey was retired in honor of Bob Love after Armstrong left the team following the 1994–1995 season. He had a consecutive games played total of 577 until late in the 1996–1997 season, third-longest in the NBA. He was also the first player selected to play for the Toronto Raptors in 1996.

 

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