Nothing will motivate a man to move forward faster than knowing what's behind Him.

Archive for the ‘Black Boxers’ Category

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For November 03



1. Larry Holmes, a former professional boxer. He grew up in Easton, Pennsylvania, hence his boxing nickname, “The Easton Assassin.”   He would win the heavyweight title in 1970 and defend it some 21 times.   61  Years ago

Events In African American History For October 30


1. In 1954, 56 Years ago Today, Defense Department eliminated segregated regiments.

2. In 1956, 54 Years ago Today, Mayor Gayle of Montgomery looks for legal ways to stop carpools.

3.  In 1966, The Black Panther Party is founded in California by Huey Newton and Bobby Seale. The full name was the Black Panther Party for Self Defense. It was formed in large measure to bring attention to and combat brutality against blacks by the Oakland, Ca., Police Department.

4. In 1974, Muhammad Ali defeats George Foreman for the heavyweight boxing title. The fight took place in Zaire, now the Congo, and was billed as the “Rumble in the Jungle.” 

5. In 1991, BET Holdings, Inc. sells 4.2 million shares of stock in an initial public offering, becoming the first black company listed on the New York Stock Exchange. Co-founder Bob Johnson has since sold the company to the media giant, Viacom.

6. In 2009, 1 Years ago Today, President Obama Signs Ryan White HIV/AIDS Treatment Extension Act of 2009

Events In African American History For October 20


1. In 1898, The North Carolina Mutual and Provident Insurance Company is founded  by John Merrick. The Company grows into the largest black-owned insurance firm in America.

2. In 1979,  John Tate Won the vacant WBA heavyweight title, beating Gerrie Coetzee in Pretoria, South Africa.

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For October 19


Byrd Prillerman

1. Byrd Prillerman, Co-founder of Virginia State College  one of West Virginia’s most prominent Negro educators, and former president of West Virginia Collegiate institute, now West Virginia State college.  one of those responsible for having the land-grant school located in the Kanawha Valley, was the fourth president. During his tenure, academic programs were expanded and the institution was given a new name “The West Virginia Collegiate Institute.” Prillerman Hall is named for him.

Lawanda Page

2. LaWanda Page,  actress and comedienne best known for her portrayal of Aunt Esther in the 1970s TV sitcom Sanford and Son. Known for using the “set you straight term” (Watch it sucker). 

Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers

3. Georgia Montgomery Davis Powers, served for 21 years as a distinguished member of the state Senate in the Commonwealth of Kentucky. When elected in 1967, she became the first person of color and the first woman elected to the Kentucky’s State Senate.

Johnnetta Betsch Cole

4. Johnnetta Betsch Cole, PhD, The first African American female president of Spelman College from 1987-1997. She was president of Bennett College from 2002-2007. She is currently serving as director of the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of African Art.

Michael Stephen Steele

5. Michael Stephen Steele, Conservative politician, serving since January 2009 as the first African American chairman of the Republican National Committee.   

Jennifer Holiday

6. Jennifer Holiday,  singer and Tony Award-winning actress. She started her career on Broadway in musicals such as Dreamgirls, and later became a successful recording artist. She is best known for her debut single, the Dreamgirls showstopper and Grammy Award-winning R&B/Pop hit, “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going.”

Evander Hollyfield

7. Evander Hollyfield, Former heavyweight Boxing Champion, He is a former World Undisputed Champion in both cruiserweight and heavyweight divisions, earning him the nickname “The Real Deal”. After winning the bronze medal in the Light Heavyweight division at the 1984 Summer Olympics, he debuted as a professional at the age of 21.

Brad Dougherty

8. Bradley Lee Daugherty, retired  basketball player with the University of North Carolina and later with the Cleveland Cavaliers of the NBA, joined ESPN’s return to NASCAR racing telecasts in 2007. He is currently a car owner and an analyst for NASCAR. 

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans for October 18


1.  Chuck Berry (Charles Edward Anderson Berry),  guitarist, singer, and songwriter, and considered one of the pioneers of rock and roll music. With songs such as “Maybellene” (1955), “Roll Over Beethoven” (1956), “Rock and Roll Music” (1957) and “Johnny B. Goode” (1958), Chuck Berry refined and developed rhythm and blues into the major elements that made rock and roll distinctive, with lyrics focusing on teen life and consumerism and utilizing guitar solos and showmanship that would be a major influence on subsequent rock music.

2. Ntozake Shange( Paulette Williams),  playwright, and poet.   As a self proclaimed black feminist, much of the content of her work addresses issues relating to race and feminism.  Shange is best-known for the Obie Award-winning play For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide When the Rainbow Is Enuf.  She also wrote Betsey Brown, a novel about an African American girl who runs away from home. Among her honors and awards are fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the Lila Wallace-Reader’s Digest Fund, and a Pushcart Prize.

3.  Terry McMillan, Novelist, editor, and educator, author. Her interest in books comes from working at alibrary when she was sixteen. She received her BA in journalism in 1986 at University of California, Berkeley. Her work is characterized by strong female protagonists.  Her first book, Mama, was self-published.   She achieved national attention in 1992 with her third novel, Waiting to Exhale, which remained on The New York Times bestseller list for many months. In 1995, Forest Whitaker turned it into a film starring Whitney Houston. In 1998, another of McMillan’s novels, How Stella Got Her Groove Back, was made into a movie. McMillan’s novel Disappearing Acts was subsequently produced as a direct-to-cable feature, starring Wesley Snipes and Sanaa Lathan. She also wrote the best seller A Day Late and a Dollar ShortThe Interruption of Everything was published on July 19, 2005. Getting to Happy, the long-awaited sequel toWaiting to Exhale, was published on September 7, 2010.

4.   Tommy Hearns,  retired  boxer. He won 8 world titles in six different weight divisions.  Hearns became the first boxer in history to win world titles in four divisions. He would also become the first fighter in history to conquer 5 world titles in 5 different divisions.  He has scored many memorable knockouts in his career and is widely considered to be one of the greatest knockout artists of all time.  Hearns was voted the greatest Super Welterweight of all time and received the “Fighter of the Year” award in 1980 and 1984.

He fought 21 current, past or future world champions.  Blessed with exceptional height for a welterweight (6’1″), a broad back, and unusually long arms, Hearns had a unique build combined with destructive punching power. He is known best for his devastating right hand, his powerful left hook and for carrying his left hand low—a stance he used to lure foes into an exchange, as well as to maximize the speed and change the angle of his jab, a technique called the “flicker jab”.

As a fighter, his aggression set him apart, controlling fights with his incredible reach, power and great boxing skills. He lost only one decision in his entire career, at the age of 33, to Iran “The Blade” Barkley.

5.   Wynton Learson Marsalis,   Trumpeter, composer, bandleader, music educator, and Artistic Director of Jazz at Lincoln Center. Marsalis has promoted the appreciation of classical and jazz music often to young audiences. Marsalis has been awarded nine Grammys in both genres, and was awarded the first Pulitzer Prize for Music for a jazz recording.  Marsalis is the son of jazz musician Ellis Marsalis, Jr. (pianist), grandson to Ellis Marsalis, Sr., and brother to Branford (saxophonist),Delfeayo (trombonist), Mboya, and Jason (drummer).

6. Cheryl “Pepsii” Riley-Grace (born October 18, 1968) is an American R&B/gospel singer and actress, best known for her 1988 ballad, “Thanks for My Child.”

Cheryl Riley, who worked as a nurse for handicapped children for ten years before beginning her singing career, topped the US R&B chartand hit the Top 40 on the pop chart at #32 with the 1988 ballad, “Thanks for My Child,” a song written by Full Force. It peaked at #75 in theUK Singles Chart in January 1989.[1] The genesis of “Thanks for My Child” began with Full Force member Bowlegged Lou’s experience with the complications of his wife’s first pregnancy.

As pivotal as “Thanks for My Child” was for Riley’s career, it was not the first song Lou offered to her. She refused his offer to record “I Wonder If I Take You Home” because she did not want to spread herself too thin, but after it became a million-selling hit for Lisa Lisa and Cult Jam in 1985, she thought she had missed her big break. Lou then offered her “Thanks for My Child”. Riley still had her nurse’s job when the song went to number one on the R&B chart.

The title track single to her debut LP Me Myself and I made it to number 18 on the R&B charts in early 1989. Another single, “Every Little Thing About You,” peaked at number 55 on the R&B charts later that year. Her second LP, Chapters, was issued and yielded the singles “How Can You Hurt the One You Love” and a cover of Aretha Franklin’s 1968 hit “Ain’t No Way”. Her third album All That! was released by Reprise, and featured the singles “Gimme” and “Guess I’m in Love.”

After a hiatus from the entertainment industry, Riley re-emerged in the early 2000s as a star in a number of gospel plays for best-selling playwright Tyler Perry, including Madea’s Class ReunionMadea Goes to JailWhy Did I Get Married? and the film version of Diary of a Mad Black Woman and Madea’s Big Happy Family.

7. Vickie Winans,  Gospel recording artist.

Events In African American History For Sept 30


 

1. In 1750, Crispus Attucks escaped from his master in Framingham Mass.

2. In 1975, Muhammad Ali and Joe Frazier fight in the “Thrilla in Manilla”. Ali wins.

3. In 1975, Virgie Ammons patents fireplace damper actuator, “Inside the fireplace chimney is a device called a “Damper”.

4. In 1991, Mike Powell broke the long jump world record when he jumped 8.95 meters at a meet in Tokyo. The previous mark-8.90 meters-was set by Bob Beamon at the 1968 Olympics.

Events In African American History For Sept 27


 

1. In 1876, Edward Mitchell Bannister upsets racist whites who believe blacks have no artistic skill by winning a bronze medal for a painting he displayed at the American Centennial Exposition in Philadelphia.

2. In 1877, John Mercer Langston named minister of Haiti.

3. In 1892, A. L. Lewis received Patent for Window cleaner.

4. In 1912, W.C. Handy published (Memphis Blues) the first Blues Song.

5. In 1915, Xavier University, the first Black Catholic college in the US, opens in New Orleans.

6. In 1950, Charles H. Houston awarded the Spingarn Medal posthumously for his pioneering work in developing the NAACP legal campaign.

7. In 1950, Ezzard Charles defeated Joe Louis in heavyweight championship fight in New York City.

8. In 1950, Gwendolyn Brooks awarded Pulitzer Prize  for her book of poetry, Annie Allen. She was the first Black cited by the Pulitzer committee.

9. In 1950, Ralph J. Bunche is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work in mediating a conflict between Palestinians and the newly established Jewish state of Israel. Arabs had gone to war arguing the Jewish state had been established on land which rightfully belonged to the Palestinians.

10. In 1967, Washington D.C.’s Anacostia Museum dedicated to informing the community of contributions by African Americans to U.S. political, social, and cultural history, opens.

11. In 1969, Baby, I’m For Real” by the Originals is released, Until then the greatest piece of pure soul ever to come from Motown

12. In 1970, Diana Ross’ “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough” is the #1 pop single and Ross’ first #1 hit as a solo artist.

13. In 1973, Fashion Fair Cosmetics went on sale at Marshall Field’s, Chicago.

Tag Cloud