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Archive for the ‘Black Brass’ Category

Events In African American History For October 27


1. In 1891, P. B. Downing received Patent for Mail Box

2. In 1896,  W. Purdy Received Patent for Device for sharpening edged tools

3. In 1931, R. B. Spikes Received Patent for Method & apparatus for obtaining average samples & temperature of tank liquids

4. In 1954,  Benjamin O. Davis Jr. Became General in the U.S. Air Force.

5. In 1960, President John F. Kennedy intervenes to get Martin Luther King, Jr., released from the Georgia State Prison in Reidsville where he had been imprisoned because of his civil rights activities.

6. In 1981, Former United Nations Ambassador Andrew Young is elected mayor of Atlanta, becoming the city’s second black mayor.

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For October 26


1. Mahalia Jackson,  gospel singer. Possessing a powerful contralto voice, she was referred to as “The Queen of Gospel”.  Jackson became one of the most influential gospel singers in the world, and was heralded internationally as a singer and civil rights activist; entertainer Harry Belafonte called her “the single most powerful black woman in the United States”.   She recorded about 30 albums (mostly for Columbia Records) during her career, and her 45 rpm records included a dozen “golds”—million-sellers.

In this Video She Sings Trouble of the World in the movie “imitations Of Life”

2. Edward Brooke, U.S. Senator 1967–1979, Republican from Massachusetts.  Politician and was the first African American to be elected by popular vote to the United States Senate[1] when he was elected as a Republican from Massachusetts in 1966, defeating his Democratic opponent,Endicott Peabody, 60.7%–38.7%. He was also the first African American elected to the Senate since the 19th century, when selection came from state legislatures, and would remain the only person of African heritage sent to the Senate in the 20th century until Democrat Carol Moseley Braun of Illinois in 1993, and was the last Republican Senator elected from Massachusetts until the 2010 election of Scott Brown. He is also the only African American reelected to the Senate.

3. William (Bootsy) Collins, Musician (Bootsy’s Rubber Band/Parliament),  funk bassist, singer, and songwriter. Rising to prominence with James Brown in the late 1960s, and with Parliament-Funkadelic in the ’70s, Collins’s driving bass guitar and humorous vocals established him as one of the leading names in funk.  Collins is a member of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, inducted in 1997 with fifteen other members of Parliament-Funkadelic.

4. Vice Admiral Regina Marcia Benjamin, USPHS, physician who serves as the 18th Surgeon General of the United States.   Dr. Benjamin previously directed a nonprofit primary care medical clinic in Bayou La Batre,Alabama.

Events In African American History For October 25


1. In 1892, 118 Years ago Today, L. F. Brown received Patent for Bridle bit Patent No. 484,994.

2. In 1940, 70 Years ago Today, Benjamin O. Davis Sr became the first Black general in US Army.

3. In 1940, Black newspaper owner’s group, the NNPA (Negro Newspaper Publishers Association), is founded.The group later changed its name to the National Newspaper Publishers Association.

4. In 1958, An estimated 10,000 students led by Jackie Robinson, Harry Belafonte, and labor leader A. Phillip Randolph, participate in a youth march for integrated schools in Washington, D.C.

5. In 1976, A  full pardon is granted to Clarence “Willie” Norris, the last known survivor of the nine “Scottsboro Boys.” The group of black men had been framed in a 1931 conviction for allegedly raping two white women.

6. In 1990, Evander Holyfield knocks out James “Buster” Douglas in the third round to become the undisputed world heavyweight champion.

7. In 1992, 18 Years ago Today, Cito Gaston, as manager of the Toronto Blue Jays, became the first Black Manager to lead a Major League Baseball team to win a world series title, defeating the Atlanta Braves.

8. in 1994  Susan Smith (a white woman) set off a nationwide man hunt when she claimed that a Black Man had car jacked her and kidnapped her two young children.  It was later revealed that she had murdered her two boys by buckling them in her car and driving them into a lake.

9. In 1997, 13 Years ago Today, The Million Woman March in Philadelphia at the Museum Of Art included Winnie Mandela and Maxine Waters as Keynote Speakers.

Events In African American History For October 16


 

1. In 1849, Avery College established in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.  Rev Charles Avery  established the Allegheny Institute and Mission Church north of Pittsburgh, with the aim of offering elementary and advanced education to qualified African-American students without regard to sex. Both the racial and the coeducational features of the program were controversial, and the school’s connection to Pittsburgh’s A.M.E. Zion Church assured a strong religious influence in the officially nonsectarian institute. (Religious affiliation was not to be a consideration in admission decisions, but instructors were expected to be professing Christians.)

2. In 1855, John Mercer Langston, probably the first black elected to public office in America, wins the race for clerk of the Brownhelm Township, Lorain County, Ohio.

3. In 1859, Harpers Ferry Insurrection.

4. In 1883,  S. E. Thomas Received Patent for Waste Trap

5. In 1895, The nation’s leading African American medical group, the National Medical Association, is founded in Atlanta.

6. In 1901, Booker T. Washington becomes the first black leader to dine at the White House with the president when Theodore Roosevelt invites him. Some black leaders charge Washington’s invitation was a result of his policies that they charge tended to accommodate racism. Nevertheless, the invitation and dinner served to crown Washington as the black leader of the period.

7. In 1940, Benjamin Oliver Davis Sr. was named the first Black General in The U.S. Army.

John Carlos and Tommie Smith

8. In 1968, Sprinters John Carlos and Tommie Smith give the clenched-fist black power salute when accepting their medals at the Mexico City Olympics as a protest against racism in America.  The white Australian sprinter in the historic picture also wore a human rights badge in support of their protest.

9. In 1973, Maynard Jackson, elected mayor of Atlanta.  He served three terms, two consecutive terms from 1974 until 1982 and a third term from 1990 to 1994. He became the first African American mayor of Atlanta in the same week that Coleman Young became the first African-American mayor of Detroit.

10. In 1984, Archbishop  Desmond Tutu is awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his work to end white-minority rule in South Africa.

11. In 1995, Nation of Islam leader, Minister Louis Farrakhan, leads the Million Man March to the Nation’s Capital in Washington, D.C. Over a million black men gather to “atone” and organize.

Birthdays Of Famous African American For October 11


1. Roscoe Robinson, Jr., was a four-star general in the United States Army.   He attended St. Louis University for only a year and then transferred to the United States Military Academyat West Point in 1947. Robinson graduated with a degree in military engineering in 1951. After graduating he served in the Korean War in 1952 as a platoon leader and rifle company commander. For his actions he received the Bronze Star. Sent back to the United States a year later he became an instructor in the Airborne Department of the United States Army Infantry School. Robinson then went on to graduate from theCommand and General Staff College at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in 1963. The following year he received his masters degree from the University of Pittsburgh in international affairs. In 1967 he served as battalion commander in Vietnam. For his achievements there he received the Legion of Merit, the Distinguished Flying Cross, 11 Air Medals, and two Silver Stars.

After Vietnam he served at the National War College for three years as the executive officer to the Chief of Staff. He was promoted to Brigadier General and in 1975 became Commanding General of the United States Army Garrison, Okinawa. He also commanded America’s Guard of Honor, the 82nd Airborne Division, as a Major General at Fort Bragg, North Carolina in 1976 and was renowned for earning the love and respect of his men, his fellow Paratroopers, during his Command – which was noteworthy for, General Robinson was, the first African-American to Command The All-American Division. His final assignment was as U.S. Military Representative to the NATO Military Committee from 1982-1985. After he had completed 34 years of service to the U.S. military he retired in 1985. He was then awarded with the Defense Distinguished Service Medal and two Distinguished Service Medals. After his retirement, he was asked to look over a panel of people who were examining the Korean War performance of some highly criticized army units. He also served on the board of Northwest Airlines.   In April 2000 there was a ceremony and a dedication at West Point for a new auditorium, named “General Roscoe Robinson, Jr. Auditorium” in his honor. The Roscoe Robinson Health Clinic at Womack Army Medical Center at Fort Bragg is also named in his honor.

2. Art Blakey, known later as Abdullah Ibn Buhaina,  Was a  jazz drummer and bandleader.  Along with Kenny Clarke and Max Roach, he was one of the inventors of the modern bebop style of drumming. He is known as a powerful musician and a vital groover; his brand of bluesy, funky hard bop was and continues to be profoundly influential on mainstream jazz. For more than 30 years his band, Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers included many young musicians who went on to become prominent names in jazz. The band’s legacy is thus not only known for the often exceptionally fine music it produced, but as a proving ground for several generations of jazz musicians;[2] Blakey’s groups are matched only by those ofMiles Davis in this regard.

3. Earle Hyman, stage, television, and film actor. Hyman is known for his recurring role on The Cosby Show as Cliff’s father, Russell Huxtable.

Lester Bowie

4. Lester Bowie, was an American jazz trumpet player, Percussionist, Vocalist and composer.  He was a member of the AACM, and cofounded the Art Ensemble of Chicago.

Curt Ford

5. Curtis Glenn Ford, is a former professional baseball player who played in the Major Leagues from 1985-1990. He played for the St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Phillies. He briefly played for the Saskatoon Smokin’ Guns of the Prairie Baseball League in 1996.  In May 2010, Ford was announced as the new manager of the Springfield Sliders, a wood-bat collegiate baseball team in the Prospect League. The team plays at Lanphier Park in Springfield, Ill.

MC Lyte

6. MC Lyte, Rapp Artists who first gained fame in the late 1980s becoming the first solo female rapper to release a full album with 1988’s critically acclaimed Lyte as a Rock.

Kimberly Aiken

7. Kimberly Aiken, Youngest Miss America 1994.  Aiken was 18 years old when she won the coveted title, and was only the fifth woman of African descent to get the crown. She won Miss Columbia and Miss South Carolina en route to her 1994 Miss America crown.

Events In African American History For Sept 21


1. In 1872, John Henry Conyers of South Carolina became the first Black student at Annapolis Naval Academy. He later resigned.

2. In 1886, S. R. Scottron Received Patent for Pole Tip

3. In 1897, F. W. Leslie received Patent for Envelope seal

4. In 1897, J. Cooper received Patent for Elevator Device

5. In 1905, Atlanta Life Insurance Co. founded

6. In 1959, The Isley Brothers make their pop chart debut with “Shout”

7. In 1989, General Colin Powell named Chairman of the joint Chiefs of Staff

Birthdays Of Famous African Americans For Sept 10


John Roy Lynch

1. John Roy Lynch, Army Officer, Lawyer and Politician. Born into slavery near Vidalia, La. Lynch would be among the first group of blacks to serve in the United States Congress after slavery was abolished. He represented the state of Mississippi. Lynch would even serve as temporary chairman of the Republican Party National Convention. During this period, the Republicans were the more progressive and open-to-blacks party. As the period of Reconstruction faded and Southern politicians made it virtually impossible for blacks to remain in political office, Lynch moved to Chicago and practiced law.

Roy Brown

2. Jamer Roy Brown, Singer and Pianist, pioneering Rhythm & Blues singer, songwriter and musician who had a primary influence on the early development of rock & roll music. Brown sang R&B tunes with a gospel feel, the first blues singer to do so.[citation needed] Although many historians and fans consider Clyde McPhatter the main singer to infuse the gospel sound into R&B, Brown started the trend of combining the church sound into R&B. The “call and response” and shouting gospel style was limited to the church prior to Brown’s arrival to the music scene. After Brown’s debut, it became the standard. His seminal “Good Rocking Tonight” was covered by many. In addition, his melismatical pleading, gospel-steeped delivery impacted the vocal styles of B.B. King, Bobby Bland, Jackie Wilson and Little Richard, among others. His role as a crucial link between postwar R&B and rock’s initial rise is severely underappreciated by the masses.

Roy Ayers

3. Roy Ayers,  funk, soul, and jazz composer and vibraphone player. Ayers began his career as a post-bop jazz artist, releasing several albums with Atlantic Records, before his tenure at Polydor Records beginning in the 1970s, during which he helped pioneer jazz-funk .  You may remember the Disco Hit “Freaky Deaky

Big Daddy Kane

4.  Antonio Hardy, better known by his stage name Big Daddy Kane, is an Rapp Artist  who started his career in 1986 as a member of the rap group the Juice Crew. He is widely considered to be one of the most influential and skilled MC’s in Hip Hop

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